This is the perfect experiment for our motto, “Don’t do it at home, do it at a friend’s home.” Who wants to make a mess in their own microwave?

Ivory soap is one of the only soaps that float. Drop it in water and check for yourself. But how does Ivory float when most soaps sink?

For this experiment, take a new, fresh bar of Ivory soap (not one that has been sitting on the shelf for a long time). Cut it into smaller pieces and note that the bar does not have pockets of air. The air is pumped into the soap during the manufacturing process. Microwave for a minute or less and watch what happens. If you microwave the soap for a long time, it will start to turn brown and gross, so watch it while it cooks.

Now, turn this demonstration into a science fair project. What will happen when you microwave different brands of soap? Why do you need a fresh bar of Ivory instead of one that sat on the shelf?

For more information and a complete experiment, visit the Ivory Soap Souffle experiment.

3 replies
  1. Emily Locklear
    Emily Locklear says:

    As I read I imagined soap bubbling over in a microwave but after I thought about it I pictured a volcano with white lava exploding! What did you imagine when you read about the exploding ivory soap?

    Reply

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