Tag Archives: steve spangler

What Is It Like to Share the Spotlight with Steve Spangler?

By Blog Editor Susan Wells

Earlier this week I had the extreme pleasure of shadowing some students from Rooney Ranch Elementary who came to our office before appearing on the Denver NBC affiliate 4:00 news program. The students’ were chosen to appear for their creative science fair projects and speaking abilities.

The students arrived with their parents at our offices around 3:00p.m. A little less than two hours before air time. Steve chatted with them and got them naturally talking and explaining their experiments. The kids were so excited and wound up, but Steve knew exactly how to get them to focus and share.

Next, they went into our studio at the Spangler Labs and did a little trial run to practice for the real television studio. The kids got a small-scale run through complete with bright lights and a desk. They had an opportunity to really begin to sharpen their chops.

After the kids were all prepped and TV-ready, Steve took a little time to share some of his latest experiments in his playroom. The playroom is the one area in our offices that Steve is allowed to make a mess and not clean it up. This is where he stores all of his toys and science materials and uses the space to practice his demonstrations. The group participated in one of the more memorable (and my least favorite) experiments, the Sissy Machine. The Sissy machine is a vintage telephone with a crank. When the phone is cranked, it generates a low voltage current. Everyone held hands and felt the current move through their bodies. The Sissy Machine is used to demonstrate how electricity travels through the body. Humans are conductors of electricity.

Steve ended the fun by lighting an alcohol rocket and setting fire to the table. A visit to Steve Spangler Science is never without some type of explosion or fire. Science definitely isn’t boring.

We loaded into cars and caravanned down to the news station. We all checked in at the front desk and headed to the studio. The kids got a quick lesson in behind the scenes news production before setting up at the guest desk and preparing for the appearance.

(My favorite part of the photo above is the little sister of one of the kids,
who almost snuck onto live television.)

Finally, their moment in the spotlight arrived. The kids all did a great job. It was fun to watch their parents’ responses to their presentations almost as much fun as it was to watch the kids do their thing. They all proved themselves worthy of the television lights. Watch their appearance on the video below. It’s not easy to go on live television in front of a million viewers and share your work. Congratulations to the kids – Zane, Julia, Dakota and Hunter and a special thank you to Steve Spangler for spotlighting some amazing science fair superstars.

Science in the Rockies Teacher Training Now Aligned to Next Gen and Common Core

As many of you know, the final version of the Next Generation Science Standards were just released in early April. Over the past few weeks, our team has been working feverishly to align Steve Spangler’s hands-on science curriculum from Science in the Rockies with these newly released standards. In addition to the science standards, we know that many of you are looking for creative strategies for connecting more hands-on science with the Common Core reading, writing and math objectives. That’s why we are very excited to share these integration strategies and creative methods for making science even more fun and meaningful for your students in the coming years.

Next Generation Science Standards are a voluntary set of rigorous and internationally benchmarked standards for K-12 science education. Twenty-six states and their teams joined 41 writers and partners to compile science and engineering content that all students should learn to prepare for college and the real world.

“The Next Generation of Science Standards promise to help students understand why is it that we have to know science and help them use scientific learning to develop critical thinking skills-which may be applied throughout their lives, no matter the topic. Today, students see science as simply a list of facts and ideas that they are expected to memorize. In contrast to that approach education researchers have learned, particularly in the last 15 to 20 years, that if we cover fewer ideas, but go into more depth, students come away with a much richer understanding,” said Joseph S. Krajcik, Professor of Science Education in the College of Education at Michigan State University and a member of the writing team.

Common Core State Standards are standards set across states to create a clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, and to put both parents and teachers on the same education team. These standards provide skills and knowledge students need to prepare for college and beyond.

Please join us in Denver July 9th through 11th for Steve Spangler’s Science in the Rockies.

Not familiar with Science in the Rockies? Every July, 150 teachers from around the world come together for three days with a team of instructors who are over-the-top excited about teaching science.

The workshop focuses on ways to bring wonder, discovery, and exploration back into your classroom through Halloween activities, electricity, things that glow, or even launching a potato out of PVC pipes. This is not a “sit-and-watch” teacher training… this is a “get-up-and-do” learning experience featuring over 75 engaging activities that you can take home and immediately share with your students.

You’ll leave the workshop with all the tools you need to become the best science teacher possible, including over $300 of gizmos, gadgets, hands-on learning materials for your students, hard-to-find supplies, and cool resources that accompany the Science in the Rockies curriculum. You’ll also receive a 250-page training manual that details every aspect of your learning experience, from the detailed instructions and recipes to the in-depth explanations and real-world applications.

The enthusiasm for making science fun spreads like a virus! Steve Spangler and his staff will change the way you teach science… forever.

 

Steve Ignites a Passion for Science at Utah Early Childhood Conference

Recently, Steve Spangler was the keynote speaker at the Utah Association for the Education of Young Children conference in Salt Lake City.

He brought his exciting collection of flaming wallets, Smoke Rings and Wind Bags to an audience of early childhood professionals. Steve shared some of his favorite demos and antidotes along with his message about the state of education today. Money gets thrown where we think education needs to be improved – early education, high school, technology and then the next buzz. We can’t settle on a solution to solve the problems and issues facing education today because we need to realize that human beings are being educated. Educate the whole person while igniting their passions for learning and discovery.

Steve’s keynote grabbed the attention of one teacher blogger…

The first (and favorite) quote I jotted down from Steve came as he was talking about all the efforts made to improve education.  He said we throw money at early ed, then we say -WAIT! No, put it over here!- and we move our attention to high school, but then -WAIT- technology!  It’s technology where we need to focus, then no -WAIT – it’s this, that, no, the other thing.  Then he said, maybe we can’t seem to settle on the solution because we need to realize, “It’s a human being.”

Read Not Just Cute’s entire post about educating the human, not the system.

Science Explodes at the Cherry Creek Foundation Luncheon

Steve Spangler, a former teacher and educator for Cherry Creek Schools, brought Bernoulli’s Principle to life for 600 people during the 19th Annual Cherry Creek Schools Foundation Luncheon on March 15.

Courtesy: Cherry Creek Schools

The crowd of business leaders, city government officials, educators and foundation volunteers were on their feet filling plastic tubes with lots of hot air.

Spangler was the keynote speaker for the luncheon, held at the DTC Hyatt Regency. Retiring Superintendent Mary Chelsey was honored along with several educators and volunteers. The luncheon also serves as a fundraiser for the foundation.

“Learning is about engagement,” Spangler said during his presentation. “It’s about creating those ‘I’ll never forget the day’ kind of moments in the classroom.”

Courtesy: Cherry Creek Schools

As 600 Wind Bags danced around the ballroom, Spangler called it a Facebook moment. but the audience called it a memorable learning moment.

Attendees also dodged smoke rings and jumped when Spangler’s wallet ignited in flames.

Spangler was a teacher in the Cherry Creek School District for 12 years before taking his show on the road to educate teachers in how to engage and excite their students about science.

“Make it big, do it right, give it class,” said Spangler of education. “And if it makes it from the classroom to the dinner table, you know you’ve done it right — activities don’t make it to the dinner table. Experiences do.”

For more photos, check out the Foundation Luncheon photo album on the Cherry Creek Schools Facebook page!

 

Steve Returns to the Ellen DeGeneres Show for 14th Appearance

What does 3,000 Alka-Seltzer Tablets, 3,000 film canisters and Steve Spangler have in common with the Ellen DeGeneres Show?

Steve demonstrated the explosive power of carbon dioxide when thousands of film canisters rained down on the Ellen set Wednesday. Cameras were covered, Ellen dressed in a rain coat, safety goggles and a hard hat and even Tony had an umbrella for protection. To say Steve blew the roof off of the Ellen Show is saying Mentos and Diet Coke make a small mess.

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