Tag Archives: Science Fair

Drinking Problems

Steve Spangler, the Master Teacher himself, has admitted that most plants have a drinking problem, so I thought I’d see for myself if that was true.

I started out with four clear vases.  I didn’t have any two that were alike, but that just makes my experiment more interesting.

No two alike!
                      No two alike!

Since I would be dealing with fresh flowers, my next step was logical: I filled each vase with some full-blown Water Jelly Marbles.  I also got out the food coloring.

I never use fresh flowers without jelly marbles.  And sometimes, food coloring.
I never use fresh flowers without jelly marbles. And sometimes, food                                                                     coloring.

Next I filled each vase with water, and then put a few drops of food coloring in each vase.  This resulted in some interested formations.

It's beautiful, isn't it.
It’s beautiful, isn’t it.

Then, I got my sharpest kitchen knife and cut a diagonal piece off the end of each flower stem.  Steve likes to give each flower a split end and let it share two vases, but I thought I would try it another way and see what happened.    Each of my flowers got its own vase.

Aren't they pretty?  You should try this!
Aren’t they pretty? You should try                                this!

The big vase got two flowers, but the three smaller vases each got one flower.  Would the size of the vase influence which flower “changed” first?  We’ll see.

Each of my four vases got a different color: yellow, blue, red, and purple.  I wondered which color would show up first. . . .

I put all of this together on Sunday afternoon.  Today is Tuesday.  Look at which color showed up first!

The little vase with the blue water won!
The little vase with the blue water                                          won!

What exactly happened here?  It’s interesting!  (All science is interesting.)  We can compare the way flowers suck water up their stem to the tips of their petals with YOU, sucking soda up your straw into your mouth.  To quote Steve Spangler:

“Okay, now it’s time to get technical. There are two things that combine to move water through plants — transpiration and cohesion. Water evaporating from the leaves, buds, and petals (transpiration) pulls water up the stem of the plant. This works in the same way as sucking on a straw. Water that evaporates from the leaves “pulls” other water behind it up to fill the space left by the evaporating water, but instead of your mouth providing the suction (as with a straw) the movement is due to evaporating water. This can happen because water sticks to itself (called water cohesion) and because the tubes in the plant stem are very small (in a part of the plant called the xylem). This process is called capillary action.”

So much of science is also beauty.  Fresh flowers in the home add beauty and fragrance, and using them to do a little science adds to the enjoyment, especially when there are children in the home.

This is a science experiment that the whole family can enjoy.  It’s simple and pretty and inexpensive, and the science fair judges would be very impressed.

Now I can hardly wait to check on my flowers tomorrow, and the next day, and the next.  If one day can show results, what will three days show?  I’ll update this post for you so you can all see what I’ll be seeing in my dining room.

 

Not Everyone Hates The Science Fair!

Science Fairs get a lot of bad press these days, and I don’t like it. Honestly? I think the only bad science fair is a science fair that a child is FORCED to enter every year.

You heard me. The science fair should be 100% voluntary, most of the time.   Maybe it would be better if fifth grade, for example, was a mandatory year, and all others were voluntary.

I fully understand that this stance will not make me very popular with a few science teachers, but as I am a science teacher and a parent, I have a right to my own opinion, which is based on personal experience as are all opinions.

Don’t get me wrong – I am a HUGE fan of science fairs. My own children looked forward to it every year, from K-8, and even while a few other kids were kicking and screaming and whining and claiming it wasn’t FAIR, the fact is, it was absolutely fair. The fair was fair.

This picture went viral recently, all over the internet.

Please click the link and read Ms. Messina's article at the Huffington Post about how and why she created this poster!
Please click the link and read Ms. Messina’s article at the Huffington Post about how and why she created this poster!

This poster was created by Susan Messina, who is not at all against science fairs – just the ones that force kids who aren’t interested to participate, too. Her article over at the Huffington Post is very interesting and informative, and will give you the background into why she decided to make the poster.

Ms. Messina suggests that if the science project is required, then it could be a family project which would allow students and parents to work together collaboratively. I disagree, unless the assignment is for a group project. I think any assigned project should be an individual thing.  Families may, and should, provide encouragement and help with supplies, and the occasional suggestion, but mostly, parents and siblings need to stand back and let the student create. However, if the assignment IS for a group project, then the science fair is the perfect chance for the entire family to learn together!  Otherwise, let the student create the project and show his/her family the creation, complete with hypothesis and experiment and results.  It’s good practice for the judges!

Parents who shamelessly do the science project themselves ruin it for all the families who do it RIGHT.

Years ago, my son was the only one in his kindergarten class to submit an entry to the science fair at his school.  He was obsessed with sea creatures at this time, and with pirates.  His project kind of reflects both interests.  Please don’t call CPS on me; he’s a grown man now.

Andy's diorama.  He had just turned 5.
Andy’s diorama. He had just turned 5.

Now, a diorama is NOT a science project, but for a kindergarten student who had had no instruction and who insisted on entering the science fair even though his teacher and the fair judges weren’t sure if a five-year-old qualified, I think it’s pretty good.  When the judges looked closely, I saw their expressions change and they convened for a chat.  Can you figure out why?

He'd read that pirates sometimes disposed of prisoners this way.
He’d read that pirates sometimes disposed of prisoners this way.

He told the judges that he wanted the bottom of the sea to look interesting.

He wanted to illustrate what happened if a pirate went swimming in infested waters.
He wanted to illustrate what happened if a pirate went swimming in infested waters.

His favorite stuffed toy was a big red octopus we got for him at Epcot.  He wanted to include Big Red in his diorama in such a way that people would remember him.

The octopus is my favorite part of Andy's diorama.
The octopus is my favorite part of Andy’s diorama.

And, he loved tubeworms.  He tried to draw a coral reef but he didn’t think pirates would dispose of a prisoner via the cement shoe route near a coral reef.  “Too many onlookers.”  He may have been only five years old, but even then he was looking ahead.

tube worms

Remember now, that a diorama is NOT a science experiment.  Do not encourage your kids to try to enter a diorama or demonstration or poster as a science project.  My little son, when asked, was able to explain the science behind why cement shoes would certainly sink a naughty pirate to the bottom of the sea, and how a foolish pirate who went swimming in shark-infested waters would certainly become the first course for a shark’s supper,  He did admit that his soft huggie octopus would probably never try to strangle a pirate, but that he’d included that scenario for effect.

But for a very young child who is only just beginning to learn about the world outside his own home, whatever strikes and holds his/her interest is something well worth encouraging.  Just be there to ask questions and be sincerely interested when your child gives you a lengthy explanation.  Take him/her to the library and look at picture books.

Do experiments in your home.  My son tied gravel to his Batman action figure’s feet to see how many it would take to sink the Dark Knight to the bottom of a pail of water.  He got out his postcard of tubeworms from Marineland to make sure he was drawing and coloring them correctly.

As he grew older, his science fair entries were actual experiments, and in seven years, he earned six blue ribbons.  His final entry, in 8th grade, was about how air pollution is destroying the world’s statues and buildings.  He took eight huge pieces of sidewalk chalk and carved them into statues, mounted them here and there on a paper-mache mountain, and sprayed them with vinegar several times a day, to represent pollution.  Every night he took a picture.

Our buildings and statues are definitely being worn down by pollution.

He wanted to use hydrochloric acid instead of vinegar, but we said “no.”

We did have some locked in the garage cabinet, though.

Doesn’t everybody?

 

Jane GoodwinJane Goodwin is a professor of expository writing at Ivy Tech Community College, a hands-on science teacher for College for Kids, a professional speaker and writer, and a social media liaison  for Steve Spangler Science.  She wanted to be a ballerina and an astronaut, but gravity got the better of her.

The Experiment of the Week Keeps Them Interested in Science!

School has started for most students by now, and many parents are wondering how to keep their kids interested in science – and other subjects – after school and on weekends.  My suggestion to these concerned and interested parents is to subscribe to the Experiment of the Week!

Steve Spangler Science Making Science Fun

Once you subscribe, you’ll get a super interesting science experiment in your email once a week!  The experiments come with full explanations of the actual science of the experiment, and usually can be done with what’s probably already in your pantry.

Your kids – and YOU – will find yourselves looking forward to every Experiment of the Week; with many families, this is a ritual they all participate in, every week.  Spangler Science’s Experiment of the Week is absolutely free of charge; just send us your email address and enjoy your free experiment – complete with a video explaining it – every week!

science rocks

While you’re signing up, why not check out our Deal of the Day?  You can score some awesome deals with this one!

Whether your children are homeschooled, unschooled, or going to public or private school, all students will benefit from participating in our Experiment of the Week.  In fact, not only will your kids benefit, they’ll look forward to it every week.  Our experiments are far more than merely educational; our experiments are loads of fun, and present scientific principles in ways that will intrigue and interest your kids while teaching them important concepts they’ll be able to apply to other things, as well.

When it’s science fair time, your kids will have sooooo many more cool ideas than the other kids will have!

Did I mention that Steve Spangler’s Experiment of the Week is FREE?  Well, I’m mentioning it again.  We want your kids to become not merely interested in science – we want your kids to become FASCINATED with science.  Come on, sign up for the Experiment of the Week.  You’ll be so glad you did, and your kids will thank you with every  individual experiment they get to experience.

Don’t think YOU will escape being interested and educated, either.  Parents are just as interested as are their kids.  You’ll find yourself anticipating that Spangler Science email as much if not more than Billy and Susie will!

Jane GoodwinJane Goodwin is a professor of expository writing at Ivy Tech Community College, a hands-on science teacher for College for Kids, a professional speaker and writer, and a social media liaison  for Steve Spangler Science.  She wanted to be a ballerina and an astronaut, but gravity got the better of her.

Valentines Science – Frozen Baking Soda and Vinegar Hearts

Baking soda and vinegar experiments begin with the classic science fair volcano and end with homemade rockets. It’s not surprising – this reaction creates bubbly, fizzing potions that are fun to create over and over.

Fizzing Baking Soda and Vinegar Valentines Hearts | Sick Science Steve Spangler Science

We decided to put a Valentines twist on the baking soda and vinegar experiment and try it with frozen hearts.

The best part? Even though this experiment stinks from all the vinegar, it’s safe to touch.

Fizzing Baking Soda and Vinegar Valentines Hearts | Sick Science Steve Spangler Science

Materials

  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Water
  • Heart shape bowl, ice forms or cookie sheet molds
  • Spoon
  • Bowl or plate

Fizzing Baking Soda and Vinegar Valentines Hearts | Sick Science Steve Spangler Science

Let’s Try it! 

(Measurements aren’t exact and will depend on size of mold. Proportions are more important)
1. Combine 3/4 vinegar to 1/4 water in heart shaped mold and freeze.
2. Combine 3/4 baking soda to 1/4 water in heart shaped mold and freeze.
3. Place frozen vinegar heart in 3/4 baking soda and 1/4 water solution.
4. Place frozen baking soda heart in pure vinegar bath.

Fizzing Baking Soda and Vinegar Valentines Hearts | Sick Science Steve Spangler Science

We found the frozen baking soda hearts fizzed and reacted much more than the frozen vinegar hearts.

The Science Behind the Reaction

The baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and vinegar (acetic acid) reaction actually occurs in two steps.

First, the acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the sodium bicarbonate to make sodium acetate and carbonic acid. The carbonic acid is unstable and basically decomposes in a reaction that produces carbon dioxide gas. The CO2 gas escapes as bubbles. These bubbles are heavier than air, so they sink or run over the plate edge, versus taking flight.

Some people add dish soap to this reaction to capture the bubbles and help the solution flow. Try adding a squirt or two of dish detergent on top of your heart and see if anything different happens.

Or try different proportions of vinegar, water and baking soda. What are your results?

Fizzing Baking Soda and Vinegar Valentines Hearts | Sick Science Steve Spangler Science

Thanks to Inspiration Laboratories where we found this original idea.

A Behind the Scenes Look at Science Fair Judging

By Blog Editor Susan Wells

A few weeks ago, I was asked to be a judge at a local middle school’s 8th grade science fair. I was so excited to volunteer to take on title of Science Fair Judge for the first time.

I had no idea what to really expect or how to perform my judging duties as I drove to the school that morning.

This science fair consisted of honor science students’ projects. The two science teachers picked the top 20 projects out of their classes for the judges to interview, but the gym was full of project boards.

Before we began, I really enjoyed wandering around and looking at all of the projects. There were so many creative and unique ideas and all of the kids did a great job. I was glad we didn’t have to narrow the field based on the boards. That was a tough decision.

Judges were given sample questions, a few instructions and were then broken into groups of three to interview students about their projects.

As we waited on the floor of the gym, I was nervous. I didn’t want to appear like I didn’t know what I was doing, but I also didn’t want to intimidate the students and grill them. I wondered if the kids could smell the fear on me, these were middle school students afterall.

Our first student came down and we began asking him questions. The poor boy was so nervous and jittery that it was hard to really follow his complicated project on bone densities. I could tell he had done a lot of research and a lot of work. I wanted to ask him to start over and explain it to me, as I was obviously not as smart as he and wasn’t following. But I didn’t want to make him more nervous, so I just listened and tried to put an intelligent, but kind look on my face. I wanted to hug him and tell him if he knew me, he’d know I was nothing to be nervous about.

I thought about what I was like when I was in 8th grade and wasn’t sure I’d be able to stand up to the pressure of talking to three adults while they grilled me about my project.

The first interview was tough, because we didn’t have anything to compare it to. All of the judges had little or no science fair judging experience, so we were all finding our way through.

We spent the next few hours taking turns interviewing students as they came down. Some were more nervous than others and some were more informed and prepared than others. I began getting a stronger sense of understanding what truly made a good project and scientist.

The actual topic of the project had very little to do with the success of a student. Here is what defined a science fair contender, some are obvious:

  • Clarity – Thoroughly researched and well thought out projects with a strong understanding of the scope, vocabulary and background
  • Complete understanding and use of independent and dependent variables
  • Scientific Thought – Hypothesis tested in investigation and research led to valid hypothesis
  • Controlled Data – Consistent experiment environment
  • Presentation – Clear and concise project boards
  • Thoroughness and Skill – Possible sources of error and understanding what they needed to do differently next time
  • Strong public speaking skills
  • Creativity and originality

During lunch, the judges came together and chose the top seven students and their projects that we believed fully met all of the criteria listed above. Those seven students had to come back that afternoon and re-interview with all eight judges. I never would have made it.

After we completed our final round of interviews, we chose the top three who were honored in a ceremony that night and won a gift card to Barnes and Noble. Not a bad prize after all that work and pressure.

The winner was unanimously chosen by all eight judges. She had stunning presentation skills, understood her project inside and out and didn’t miss a thing. Her project involved testing how dog food is broken down in the stomach and which one is best to feed your dog. She simulated a dog stomach with lemon juice and water and let dog food pieces dissolve for a set time to see which one worked the best. We had to ask her definitions for some of the terms she used, because some of it went over our heads. She knew exactly how she would do the experiment better next time – use a balloon to better simulate a stomach with motion and digesting. Wow. Nothing like being blown over by an eighth grader.

Looking for a great science fair experiment, here are the top seven projects that won –

  1. Which dog food is the most nutritious?
  2. The 5 Second Rule with Cucumbers – Can food pick up germs after hitting the floor for 5 seconds, 1 minute, 1 hour?
  3. Which ski jacket keeps you warmest in cold weather?
  4. Which green material keeps your house coolest in summer? Using bird houses and wheat grass.
  5. Music to My Feet – the effect of positive music on energy burned while exercising.
  6. Phantom pain – can you correctly identify touch sensations when you can’t see it?
  7. Bacteria Growth – does soap or hand sanitizer work better to kill germs?
Congratulations to all of the students on your hard work and effort. I hope to be asked back again next year when I’ll be a seasoned judge with a year of experience behind me.