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Slime Party - Elmer’s Glue Borax Recipes

Throw a slime party with the best recipe using Elmer's glue and Borax solution

Rating: 54321

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Throwing your own slime party is as easy as a trip to the grocery store to pick up these simple materials. Depending on how you make it, you'll get something that's stringy or slimy or more solid like putty. It's up you and how you want to make it. This variation on slime or putty or gak or flubber will probably remind you of a similar substance found in many toy stores. This is the most popular version of do-it-yourself slime because it's so easy to make and serves as a great visual tool for introducing students to the properties of polymers.

Find out how to make the best Halloween Slime using the secret ingredient the pros use... clear PVA solution.

Materials
  • Elmers Glue (8 oz bottle of Elmers Glue-All)
  • Borax (a powdered soap found in the grocery store)
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup (8 oz size works well)
  • Spoon
  • Measuring cup
  • Food coloring (the spice of life)
  • Water
  • Paper towel (hey, youve got to clean up!)
  • Zipper-lock bag (dont you want to keep it when youre done?)
  • Water

Videos

  • Ultimate Gooey Slime - Halloween Sick Science! #003
Print Experiment

Experiment

Here’s the easiest way to make a big batch Elmer’s Slime. The measurements do not have to be exact but it’s a good idea to start with the proportions below for the first batch. Just vary the quantities of each ingredient to get a new and interesting batch of goo.

  1. This recipe is based on using a brand new 8 ounce bottle of Elmer’s Glue. Empty the entire bottle of glue into a mixing bowl. Fill the empty bottle with warm water and shake (okay, put the lid on first and then shake). Pour the glue-water mixture into the mixing bowl and use the spoon to mix well.
  2. Go ahead… add a drop or two of food coloring. 
  3. Measure 1/2 cup of warm water into the plastic cup and add a teaspoon of Borax powder to the water. Stir the solution – don’t worry if all of the powder dissolves. This Borax solution is the secret linking agent that causes the Elmer’s Glue molecules to turn into slime.
  4. While stirring the glue in the mixing bowl, slowly add a little of the Borax solution. Immediately you’ll feel the long strands of molecules starting to connect. It’s time to abandon the spoon and use your hands to do the serious mixing. Keep adding the Borax solution to the glue mixture (don’t stop mixing) until you get a perfect batch of Elmer’s slime. You might like your slime more stringy while others like firm slime. Hey, you’re the head slime mixologist – do it your way!
  5. When you’re finished playing with your Elmer’s slime, seal it up in a zipper-lock bag for safe keeping.

How Does It Work?

The mixture of Elmer’s Glue with Borax and water produces a putty-like material called a polymer. In simplest terms, a polymer is a long chain of molecules. You can use the example of cooking spaghetti to better understand why this polymer behaves in the way it does. When a pile of freshly cooked spaghetti comes out of the hot water and into the bowl, the strands flow like a liquid from the pan to the bowl. This is because the spaghetti strands are slippery and slide over one another. After awhile, the water drains off of the pasta and the strands start to stick together. The spaghetti takes on a rubbery texture. Wait a little while longer for all of the water to evaporate and the pile of spaghetti turns into a solid mass -- drop it on the floor and watch it bounce.

Many natural and synthetic polymers behave in a similar manner. Polymers are made out of long strands of molecules like spaghetti. If the long molecules slide past each other easily, then the substance acts like a liquid because the molecules flow. If the molecules stick together at a few places along the strand, then the substance behaves like a rubbery solid called an elastomer. Borax is the compound that is responsible for hooking the glue’s molecules together to form the putty-like material. There are several different methods for making this putty-like material. Some recipes call for liquid starch instead of Borax soap. Either way, when you make this homemade Silly Putty you are learning about some of the properties of polymers.

Elmer's Slime is very easy to make, but it's not exactly what you'll find at the toy store. So, what's the "real" slime secret? It's an ingredient called polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The cross-linking agent is still Borax, but the resulting slime is longer lasting, more transparent... it's the real deal.

Additional Info

Jeff Harken contributed this "history" of Silly Putty.

The history of Silly Putty is quite amusing. In 1943 James Wright, an engineer, was attempting to create a synthetic rubber. He was unable to achieve the properties he was looking for and put his creation (later to be called Silly Putty) on the shelf as a failure. A few years later, a salesman for the Dow Corning Corporation was using the putty to entertain some customers. One of his customers became intrigued with the putty and saw that it had potential as a new toy. In 1957, after being endorsed on the "Howdy Doody Show", Silly Putty became a toy fad. Recently new uses such as a grip strengthener and as an art medium have been developed. Silly Putty even went into space on the Apollo 8 mission. The polymers in Silly Putty have covalent bonds within the molecules, but hydrogen bonds between the molecules. The hydrogen bonds are easily broken. When small amounts of stress are slowly applied to the putty, only a few bonds are broken and the putty "flows." When larger amounts of stress are applied quickly, there are many hydrogen bonds that break, causing the putty to break or tear.

Customer Reviews

Carissa Walters Scouter Review by Carissa Walters
54321

I've been using the gel Elmer's glue for a clearer slime. Using Steve's Atomic Glow makes it even more fun for Halloween.

(Posted on September 8, 2010)

Slime Bubbles Review by Kelley
54321

If you cover the tip of a bendy straw with the slime, you can blow bubbles.

...It's fun!

(Posted on June 21, 2011)

Gloop Review by Anonymous S.W.
43211

The glop is so cool! I really liked the texture of it!

(Posted on October 4, 2012)

Question... Review by Essa
43211

What if my Goo/Slime is very sticky? What can I do to not make it so "sticky"??

Essa -
Try adjusting your mixture. Use more glue, or more borax. Whatever you do, keep experimenting!
- Steve Spangler Science Web Team

(Posted on November 22, 2012)

Do not use Washable Glue! Review by AZ Mom
43211

My 4-year-old son loves this project. We have made Gak several times. We usually dye it green so it looks like the Ooblek in Dr. Seuss' story.

I do not recall seeing any info on using a washable white glue vs. non-washable, and so we decided to experiment today. The washable glue resulted in a much less pliable lump. It was also a little tacky on the hands. Fortunately, I bought a bottle of non-washable glue as a back up so we could make a new batch. Much better!

(Posted on April 19, 2012)

GAK Review by Julie Mace
54321

This is great! My kids played with this all saturday afternoon! Each of my four children had their own color and container and were doing "infomercials" for GAK! I love it!

(Posted on October 23, 2010)

A word of caution Review by David Hibberd
54321

White glue slime is fun for everyone. Be aware that kids will try all things with it and that slime on hair is not a good combination. If that should happen, a product like Goo Gone helps seperate the slime from the kid.

(Posted on August 3, 2009)

Keyboard Cleaner Review by Jeff
54321

When I was young my friend's mother would make this for us to play with. A few weeks ago I bought some blank CDs at a office supply store and I was given a free pack of something called Cyber Clean. The idea is to mash it into your keyboard and it collects the dust between the keys. As soon as I pulled it out of the pack I recognized the smell of elmers + borax. It works really well for cleaning dust off of keyboards and monitors. Thanks for the recipe.

(Posted on December 29, 2009)

Wonderful slime! Review by Rosanne Hewitt
54321

We recently had a science birthday party for my 7 year-old son and we performed a few experiments. This was one of the best for the kids. They loved mixing everything themselves and then adding food coloring to get some very unique shades. They had dirty hands, but everyone went home talking about it. And they got to take their experiments (and directions) with them for a later time. Great, easy and fun project for the kids!

(Posted on September 8, 2010)

Excellent Recipe! Review by Erin Maday
54321

This is great fun! I love the fact that you can easily get the ingredients locally, and the whole process is about 10 min. It's sooo easy. My 2 boys were crazy about this project! They LOVED the fact that it all starts out as a liquid and ends up as slime! My 7 yr old was in awe how quickly it changed from liquid to not quite a solid but not quite a liquid. highly recommended! Love this website, too, Steve! YOU ROCK!!!

 

(Posted on October 13, 2010)

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