A few weeks back, we demystified the Common Core State Standards to clearly explain what they are all about. Common Core does not cover science. The Next Generation Science Standards were designed to set a national standard in science and give teachers and their students direction towards college prep and careers in science.

What are the Next Generation Science Standards and Why Do We Need Them? | Steve Spangler Blog

Before the NGSS came into play, the states used the National Science Education Standards from the National Research Council and Benchmarks for Science Literacy from the American Association for the Advancement of Science to guide their state science standards. The standards were high quality and worked well, but are now over 15 years old. In that time, major advancements in science have taken place along with a better understanding of how students learn science.

In 2007, a report from a Carnegie Foundation commission concluded, “the nation’s capacity to innovate for economic growth and the ability of American workers to thrive in the modern workforce depend on a broad foundation of math and science learning, as do our hopes for preserving a vibrant democracy and the promise of social mobility that lie at the heart of the American dream.”

http://vimeo.com/64246763

Not surprising, they also found the science and mathematics education in the U.S. was far below expectations and set to leave millions of young Americans unprepared to succeed in the future global economy. In 2009, the United States ranked 14th in reading, 17th in science and 25th in mathematics out of 34 countries.  In 2012, 54% of high school graduates did not meet the college readiness benchmark levels in mathematics and 69% of graduates failed to meet the benchmarks in science.

Science and mathematics education is not just for students preparing for careers in engineering, technology, science or accounting. In our constantly changing, always updating society, the need for higher education in skilled jobs is much higher than unskilled jobs. Many of the fastest growing career fields involve science and math. Information, technology and knowledge turns over about every 17 months in our modern society. Think about how fast a smart phone becomes out of date.

Normally we teach out of context. The biology teacher is teaching here. The mathematics teacher there. The english teacher over here. And when it’s time to synthesize? Guess what? We aren’t there.
– Fred D. Johnson, Past President National Science Teachers Association.

The National Association of State Directors of Career Education grouped all occupations into 16 clusters. Fourteen of the clusters require four years of science while the remaining two require three years. The message – “to keep all options open and maximize their opportunities, all students should follow a rigorous program in both science and mathematics,” according to the NGSS website.

It’s not just careers that depend upon advances in society.  We face global problems from pandemics to global warming and climate change to energy shortages. The solutions lie in science and technological discoveries and advancement. Our survival is dependent on our abilities to train future scientists and problem solvers.

What are the Next Generation Science Standards and Why Do We Need Them? | Steve Spangler Blog

From all of these needs and demands for the present and the future, the Next Generation Science Standards were born. The NGSS will provide students a content-rich education across the STEM subjects to prepare them for college and careers. This will ensure all students receive an internationally benchmarked science education. They aren’t a curriculum, but a content plan that all students should learn from kindergarten to high school graduation. States and local districts who adopt them will need to develop their own specific content and curriculum.

Science isn’t just a mere bunch of facts. Science is about the way we think about the world. The way we question the world. The way we communicate about the world. Developing that is a huge piece of the new standards.
– Jonathan Gerlach 2011-2012 Einstein Capitol Hill Fellow, U.S. Department of Energy.

Twenty-six states, a 41-member writing team and educational partners worked to develop the Next Generation Science Standards. The framework was developed by 18 experts in science, engineering, cognitive science, teaching and learning, curriculum, assessment and education policy. The framework was then presented for public feedback and opinion. Then state policy leaders, higher education, K-12 teachers, the science and business community developed science standards grounded in the framework. Those standards were also open for public feedback.

What are the Next Generation Science Standards and Why Do We Need Them? | Steve Spangler Blog

The federal government is not involved or funding the Next Generation Science Standards. It is up to each individual state to choose the NGSS and adapt them. They will also individually decide whether to create assessments connected to the NGSS. The 26 states currently involved are Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, Montana, South Dakota, Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, Illinois, Arkansas, Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, Georgia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Maine, New York, Vermont, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Maryland, Delaware and Massachusetts.

Why NGSS? from Achieve on Vimeo.

 

Information in this article courtesy Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS.

 

 

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