Tag Archives: St. Patrick’s Day

Leprechaun Visits, Green Water and Lots of Mischief for St. Patrick's Day

By Blog Editor Susan Wells

It’s almost time for leprechauns, shamrocks and green water. Yes, it’s March and time for St. Patrick’s Day. If you are looking for some activities and fun things to do with your kids at home or students in the classroom, we have a few ideas.

Leprechaun Traps:

Start with a plan, maybe even diagram your design, then use Legos, cardboard boxes, popsicle sticks, PVC pipes, gold coins, Lucky Charms and green paint to make it come to life. Here is a trap that Steve made several years ago with his son using PVC pipe, gold water and a plastic cup. They spent a little too much time in Home Depot but their end result came out great.

Leprechaun Secrets: 

Did you know that leprechauns have more than one secret? They know where they have hidden the gold, but they also keep other secrets as well. The leprechaunologists at Steve Spangler Science (yes, we have a few on staff) have discovered the leprechauns’ hidden rainbows, leprechaun beads, leprechaun green worms and leprechaun eggs. Learn more about how to uncover these secrets yourself with our Leprechaun Science Kit at SteveSpanglerScience.com.

Leprechauns also know how to turn the water green at your house. Steve did this as well with his kids a few years ago. It’s as simple as waiting for the kids to go to bed and dropping a few color changing tablets into the toilet tank and faucet screen.

The leprechauns visit our house every year. In February, my daughters start planning their traps and getting excited about the visit on March 17th. They are sure they will catch a leprechaun and steal its gold. Somehow that never happens but the leprechauns wreak havoc in our house. Chairs are turned over, cabinet doors left open, pillows tossed around and the water is green. I turned the milk green one year but the food coloring does something to the milk and none of us could stand it, so I let the leprechauns know that green milk is not ok.

I change the water to green by dropping blue and yellow tablets into the toilet, then unscrewing the screens on the faucets and carefully placing a blue and yellow tablet in each before screwing it back on. You have to be careful because the screen is usually wet, which makes the water drip green into the sink. This trick is old hat in our house, so my girls wake up, run and turn on all the faucets and then check for the next surprise. How fun would this be if a teacher turned the water green in her classroom sink?

It has been difficult to come up with different ways the leprechauns can cause mischief.

They have left gold flecks (glitter) in a path across the floor, hidden gold chocolate coins, left disappearing eggs (Jelly Marbles in water), colored green carnations (food coloring and water in vase) and leprechaun soup mix. Leprechaun soup is actually Pistachio pudding mix. When you add milk to the mix, it turns green. No one really likes the flavor, so we tend to pitch it after a few days.

Baby Got Craft has a great idea for using the pistachio pudding mix in Leprechaun dust. Put a little pistachio mix into a baby food jar, add milk and shake. I like how each kid can make their own individual serving. She also made adorable labels for the jars. I wish I were that crafty.

This year, I want to try my hand at green eggs. Not sure I’ll be able to stomach it, but it should be fun for the girls. I also found necklaces at Target and gold coins. I found a few people on Pinterest who have left leprechaun footprints.  The Crafting Chicks have a great idea to make tiny footprints with their hands.

Don’t forget to check out our Pinterest St. Patrick’s board for lots of leprechaun traps and additional ideas for the holiday that aren’t necessarily science based.

What do you do for St. Patrick’s Day? Do you set traps or have leprechaun visits?

 

Leprechauns Beware: Beautiful Trap Ahead

Ann and her granddaughter shared their leprechaun trap with us earlier this week. They used our leprechaun trap as inspiration but “made it more girly.” Instead of PVC pipe, they made a tree from branches with green glitter and added green Lucky Charms for leaves. The bait is also Lucky Charms Double Clover Leaf edition. When the leprechaun tries to steal the Lucky Charms, the trap will spring. The trap is cleverly disguised in a pot of gold. The pot has a hole on the bottom and will cover the leprechaun and trap it inside.

We haven’t heard if the trap was successful overnight.

Did you try to capture a leprechaun? What kind of trap did you build and what did you use for bait?

Update: Ann and her granddaughter Makayla gave us an update on how their trap fared  – “Unfortunately, the leprechaun escaped today. He left us a note saying good try & better luck next year. Those leprechauns are pretty tricky. Ours sprung all the traps in the classroom & left green footprints everywhere!”

Build a Trap, Catch a Leprechaun for St. Patrick’s Day

It’s St. Patrick’s Day eve. The day when children and adults alike put the finishing touches on their leprechaun traps.

Catching a leprechaun is tricky business. They are very sneaky and don’t play fair, so no one has ever caught a leprechaun.

Yet.

My boys and I build a leprechaun trap every year to try and catch these dastardly creatures.

In building a leprechaun trap, you need to start with bait. Lucky Charms cereal is always good, or gold pennies or gold water. Rainbows and anything shiny are also a good draw. Make sure your trap is rigged to come down fast on the little guys.

If you are lucky, the leprechaun will leave behind green snow or eggs or even worms. If you are off the charts lucky, you will have the little devil inside your trap come St. Patrick’s Day morning.

Here are some links to our favorite leprechaun traps…

Spangler Family Leprechaun Trap

Disney Family Fun – To Catch a Leprechaun

The World’s Geekiest Leprechaun Traps

eHow Leprechaun Trap

Science Secrets of Leprechauns Revealed

Next to Halloween, St. Patrick’s Day is a favorite holiday of mine. From the first year the leprechauns turned our water green, I have worked hard to uncover the secrets of the leprechauns.

My crack team of Leprechaun Specialists have discovered how the sneaky little guys turn water and snow green, lay eggs and uncover hidden rainbows.

The leprechaun science doesn’t end there. Leprechauns maybe small, but they eat large sandwiches. The secret is in an inflatable eight-foot sandwich bag that is blown up with only one breath. They also make jewelry out of leprechaun beads that change color in the sunlight.

Don’t forget to build your leprechaun trap this year and fish for leprechauns using green worms.

You can win your own Leprechaun Science Kit from Steve Spangler Science and Mile High Mamas >

We’d love to hear about your leprechaun tricks and traps. Please leave us a comment about how you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day.

Best of Spangler Science 2009

It’s been quite a year for us at Steve Spangler Science… in fact, when the year starts out with 50 off your closest friends helping you wish Ellen DeGeneres a Happy Birthday, you know big things are in store.  Whether we were letting fans ride on the infamous Bed of Nails at NAEYC 2009 or launching trash cans with a police force audience, we can guarantee that 2009 was never boring.  We’ve compiled some of our favorite highlights from the year, so feel free to browse through them and go back with us as we reminisce about our favorite moments from 2009… can you imagine what 2010 has in store?

ellen-birthday-12-30-09Happy Birthday Ellen!

Our 2009 Boot Camp tour kicks off in Oklahoma City, with a great group of teachers.

Our team stormed Toy Fair and set off a few geysers in the process.

Steve Spangler Science Jelly Marbles were featured on the prime-time hit series Numb3rs.

I debuted what would become one of our most requested experiments… Laminar Flow.

The face of our Insta-Snow product, Arianne Heaton, headed to college, years after she was my student at Willow Creek Elementary.

I spoke to an awesome group of teachers at the Junior League of Greater Princeton.

I was honored to have the amazing opportunity to visit Ireland and present a seminar for the Irish Science Teacher’s Association.

My St. Patrick’s Day festivities earned me a (prestigious?) Geek Dad Honor.

We debuted our Experiment of the Week widget for fans and friends to post on their blogs and the downloads haven’t stopped since!

I had the opportunity to let Ellen DeGeneres ride the Bed of Nails on my March appearance on Ellen’s show.

We honored some amazing teachers when we celebrated Teacher Appreciation Month at SteveSpanglerScience.com.

We enlisted an unexpected “audience” when our Flying Trash Can experiments brought the police to our offices.

I am proud to say that we won two Multi-Chanel Merchant awards, including Best Website of the Year.

We received a Guinness World Record and educated over 5,000 students with our first annual Weather and Science Day at Coor’s Field.

We took our teacher training experience to a whole new level with our first-ever Science at Sea program.

In conjunction with Klutz Press, we launched a new book, Boom Splat Kablooey!, and a new depth charge for our Geyser Tube.

I had the chance to spend some time with the Evolution of Dance guy, Judson Laipply, and record one really cool video.

I took on the media hype and helped 9News determine if the “Balloon Boy” balloon could have lifted the weight of a small child.

We launched one of my favorite products at SteveSpanglerScience.com this year… Film Canister Rockets!

After the huge success of the Bed of Nails on the Ellen DeGeneres show, we decided to bring the experience to the teachers at NAEYC 2009.

I had the opportunity to speak to a great group of teachers at the Reach Them to Teach Them conference.

Our Spangler Science team pulled off a surprise assembly for some deserving kids in the community… and taught them how to make “snow.”

My son, Jack, tackled that age-old question, “Is double-dipping your chip as bad as licking the whole bowl?”

We debuted another line of educational toys in conjunction with SONIC restaurants.