Glow in the Dark Jack-o-Lantern Halloween Party Favors

Ooey, gooey gross slime, brains and worms go hand-in-hand with Halloween. If you are a room mom or parent planning any type of Halloween party this October, we have the best Halloween party favor for your guests.

The best part of this party favor? It isn’t more candy.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Kids love tactile materials – things that squish between their fingers and make all kinds of sounds. After a smashing Halloween party, send the kids home with Jack-o-Lantern slime.

We used our Atomic Slime Kit but you can also make your own slime with this simple slime recipe –

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Halloween Science Activity Guide | Steve Spangler ScienceMaterials

  • Elmers Glue (8 oz bottle of Elmers Glue-All or Glue Gel)
  • Borax (a powdered soap found in the grocery store)
  • Atomic Glow (to make the slime glow)
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup (8 oz size works well)
  • Spoon
  • Measuring cup
  • Food coloring (Neon colors work awesome!)
  • Water
  • Paper towel (hey, youve got to clean up!)

Make Slime

  • This recipe is based on using a brand new 8 ounce bottle of Elmer’s Glue. Empty the entire bottle of glue into a mixing bowl. Fill the empty bottle with warm water and shake (okay, put the lid on first and then shake). Pour the glue-water mixture into the mixing bowl and use the spoon to mix well.
  • Go ahead… add a drop or two of food coloring or several drops of Atomic Glow to color or make it glow.
Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science
Adding the food coloring
  • Measure 1/2 cup of warm water into the plastic cup and add a teaspoon of Borax powder to the water. Stir the solution – don’t worry if all of the powder dissolves. This Borax solution is the secret linking agent that causes the Elmer’s Glue molecules to turn into slime.
  • While stirring the glue in the mixing bowl, slowly add a little of the Borax solution. Immediately you’ll feel the long strands of molecules starting to connect. It’s time to abandon the spoon and use your hands to do the serious mixing. Keep adding the Borax solution to the glue mixture (don’t stop mixing) until you get a perfect batch of Elmer’s slime.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Assembling the Party Favors

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Draw a jack-o-lantern face on each cup and let dry. Spoon a glop of slime into each cup. Seal with the lid and set aside for sharing.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Huge thanks to Allison at Learn – Play – Imagine for the original idea!

Professional Development for Teachers – New Online Virtual Science Workshop

We are proud to announce a new resource for teachers looking to keep their teaching credentials up to date while learning hands-on science experiments and lessons to bring into their classrooms.

Our new online Virtual Science Workshop brings teacher training and development into the comfort of your own home. No need to travel and spend nights away from home. Put on those comfy clothes and invite Steve Spangler into your living room. We will even ship workshop materials right to your front door.

Learn How to Register for Virtual Science Workshop at Steve Spangler Science

 

 

This is not your typical webinar – no headless voice endlessly talking over slides. The Spangler Online Learning platform incorporates high definition video, interactive learning prompts, downloadable handouts, online assessments and even a certificate of completion.

“Going virtual requires the trainer to use new strategies and instructional methods to keep the long-distance learner constantly engaged and committed to the learning experience.” – Steve Spangler

Our teacher training captures more than five hours of high energy content organized into easy-to-manage learning segments that make it convenient to learn at your own pace. Start, stop and rewind to make sure you capture every aspect of this learning experience.

Learn online anytime with Steve Spangler - Teacher Certification with Spangler Online Learning

  • Participate in more than 30 ready-to-use science activities that are inquiry-based, standard-related, and kid-tested
  • Develop inquiry-based activities that strengthen critical thinking skills and challenge students to ask the important “Why?” questions
  • Use elements of the story line in popular pieces of children’s literature to teach and reinforce fundamental building blocks of your science curriculum
  • Discover ways to use attention-grabbing science experiments as daily writing prompts
  • Gain a deeper understanding of the real science behind all the fun activities
  • Use the “Failure Model” to teach the scientific method
  • Develop classroom safety procedures to protect yourself and students against common accidents
  • Turn ordinary science activities into unforgettable learning experiences
  • Learn how to become a more effective science teacher without spending more money

 

Test Tube Desk Organizers for a Teacher or Science Fan

The main purpose of all of our products at Steve Spangler Science is to make science fun. It’s even our slogan. But not everyone uses our science supplies for their intended purpose. We always enjoy hearing about innovative ways that our customers are using our products.

For your favorite teacher or science fan - a Test Tube desk organizer | Steve Spangler Science

We decided to take a step back from our science focus and look at some of our products more creatively. Our Baby Soda Bottle Test Tubes and Rack are purchased for so much more than lab supplies. Some use them to store beads and buttons and other sewing items, fishing lures and hooks, jewelry kit accessories, earrings, travel products like shampoo and anything and everything that should stay dry and fit into the tube. A woodworker even recommended Baby Soda Bottles for safe small saw blade storage.

Here’s a new idea we came up with  for the science fan or teacher in your life – use Baby Soda Bottles and a Rack for a desk organizer. The test tubes will hold all of your small pushpins, staples, paperclips, rubber bands and anything else you want to stuff into them. It’s also a safe place to store scissors.

The Baby Soda Bottle Desk Organizer is an inexpensive and creative gift or organizing solution for disorganized teachers, students and science fans.

For your favorite teacher or science fan - a Test Tube desk organizer | Steve Spangler Science

For thirty science activities that use Baby Soda Bottles, visit the experiment page.

To purchase a set of six Baby Soda Bottles and a Rack, visit the Steve Spangler Science store. Office supplies sold at local retailers.

Steve Spangler Explains the Science Behind on The Doctors Science Lab

Steve Spangler visited the set of The Doctors Science Lab this week to share lessons on the science behind some health discomforts…

Steve Spangler Explained the science behind food poisoning using Elephant's Toothpaste on The Doctors TV

 

With Steve as their lab instructor, The Doctors donned their lab coats and went to work. They used Red Cabbage Indicator, Milk of Magnesia, giant flasks and a few ‘glubs’ of vinegar to demonstrate how antacids work and the classic Elephant’s Toothpaste demonstration to show what happens with food poisoning in the stomach.

Continue reading Steve Spangler Explains the Science Behind on The Doctors Science Lab

High School Students Get a Kitchen Science Lesson with Homemade Ice Cream

Students taking a culinary class at Springs Valley High School in French Lick, Indiana experimented using our Sick Science! Homemade Ice Cream recipe in class last week. They were studying the different ways to make ice cream. They first made ice cream using a churn and then tried our way using a Zip-Loc bag and a lot of ice.

A high school student makes ice cream in a science lab.

The students and their instructor Lisa Wray, enjoyed all of their hard work. Their school building also includes a preschool and the class plans on making more ice cream and sharing it with their tiny counterparts.

 

Students show off their homemade ice cream in their science lab

You can also make homemade ice cream with some materials and ingredients found in your kitchen, although you may need to take a trip to the store for rock salt.

What You Will Need: 

  • Large (1 gallon) plastic jar (a coffee can works, too)
  • 2 quart-size zipper-lock bags
  • Half & Half
  • Crushed ice (or snow in the winter!)
  • Rock salt
  • Vanilla
  • Sugar
  • Towel (or winter gloves)

Prep Time: 

  • About 10 minutes to pull together the ingredients and supplies.

Time the Activity Will Take: 

  • Ice cream will take about 20 minutes to make. 

 

Let’s Do It! 

  • Fill the plastic jar about half full with crushed ice.
  • Add about 6 tablespoons of rock salt to the ice. Seal the plastic jar and shake the ice and salt for about five minutes. You’ll need to wear your gloves when you’re handling the jar. If you’re curious as to why you have to wear gloves, measure the temperature of the mixture with a thermometer. The rock salt and ice mixture gets down to about 14 degrees F (-10 degrees C)!
  • Use one quart-size zipper-lock bag to mix the following ingredients:
    • 1/2 cup of Half & Half
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Play and Freeze Ice Cream MakerSeal tightly, allowing as little air to remain in the bag as possible. Too much air left inside may force the bag open during shaking.
  • Place this bag inside the other quart-size bag, again leaving as little air inside as possible and sealing well. By double-bagging, the risk of salt and ice leaking into the ice cream is minimized.
  • Place the two bags inside the jar with the ice and seal the bag. Wrap the bag in the towel or put your gloves on. Shake, rock, roll, and mix that can! Your ice cream should be ready after about 15-20 minutes.
  • Once mixed, remove the inner bags from the jar and rinse them well with water. You don’t want any salt water accidentally getting into your ice cream.

Vanilla doesn’t have to be the only flavor. Add chocolate syrup, strawberry syrup, fresh fruit or nuts to experiment with flavor.

With a classroom of kids, use small snack baggies to make individual servings.