Steve Spangler Learning DVD's – A Classroom Resource

Do you love Sick Science!™ as much as we do?

Do you lay awake at night wondering who’s torso is performing the experiments (hint it isn’t Steve).

What about that catchy music? Da da da da. Da da da da. Da ding. Ding.

Sick Science! Steve Spangler Science DVD - Hands-on Science Experiments

Sick Science! is all about bringing science to life through hands-on exploration that uses items found right in your own home or classroom. The series will have young scientists engaging with physics demonstrations, uncovering secret messages, unlocking the baby diaper secret, and mixing colors in brand new ways. This “sick” style of learning will capture the minds and imaginations of everyone involved.

The demonstrations are simple and easy to replicate.

Now, you can watch those videos anywhere with our Sick Science! DVD Collection, Volumes One and Two. Each volume comes with 10 hands-on experiments you can do in your home or classroom without a lot of fancy or expensive materials.

Sick Science! Volume 1 DVD - Hands-on Science Experiments

Sick Science™ Volume 1

  • Why Does Water Rise?
  • American Flag Optical Illusion
  • Ultimate Gooey Slime
  • Spooky Halloween Beverage
  • The Coin Drop
  • Dry Ice Bubbling Acid
  • Dry Ice Smoke Ring Launcher
  • Toothpick Star Table Trick
  • Balancing Utensils Table Trick
  • The Tablecloth Trick

All videos end with a question about the experiment. After you watch the experiments, switch over to the Science Behind section where Steve Spangler explains how each experiment works and answers the question (in case you are stumped). He will also show you how to take it further as a science fair project or in-depth learning tool.

Sick Science! Volume 2 DVD - Hands-on Science Experiments

Sick Science™ Volume 2

  • Magic Traveling Flame
  • Amazing 9 Layer Density Tower
  • Pendulum Catch
  • Secret Message
  • Cork in the Bottle
  • Taco Sauce Penny Cleaner
  • Baby Diaper Secret
  • Color Changing Milk
  • Color Mixing Wheel
  • Color Changing Carnations

The videos are aimed at parents and teachers who want to amaze their children and instill a sense of wonder and discovery.

Sick Science! Spooky Halloween DVD - Hands-on Science Experiments

And in time for Halloween, we have a special edition of Sick Science! The Spooky Halloween Science DVD contains 10 slimy, creepy, glowing activities to celebrate the holiday. Here are the experiments that are included -

  • Ultimate Gooey Slime
  • Dry Ice Floating Bubble
  • Goldenrod Paper Message
  • Boo Bubble – Dry Ice Science
  • Black Light – Secret Message
  • Smoking Bubbles
  • Dry Ice Crystal Ball Bubble
  • Gravi-Goo
  • Ghost Marbles
  • Dry Ice Smoke Ring Launcher

So order our DVD Sick Science! Series today. Then come back and share your experiences in the comments below. What worked best for you and what was a #fail?

Decorating Glow in the Dark Magnetic Pumpkins for Halloween

By Blog Editor Susan Wells

I’ve carved pumpkins every Halloween with my children for years. Confession – I really hate it.

1. The pumpkin guts sting my hands.
2. It’s hard to scrape and clean it out.
3. It makes a big gloopy mess without a lot of fun.
4. My girls have a hard time actually carving and I end up doing it. Alone. While they shout from the next room, “are you done yet?”

This year I decided to break with tradition and not carve pumpkins. So I began looking for crafty ideas that included a little science and a void of pumpkin innards.

How to Make Magnetic Glow in the Dark Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science
Look closely to see the dark blue glow in the eyes – the invisible pen creates this effect.

Glow in the Dark Magnetic Jack-o-Lanterns

I ended up adding a Magnetic Paint with a little Zinc Sulfide and a lot of creativity.Halloween Science Activity Guide | Steve Spangler Science

Materials

Set-Up Time
- About 10 minutes

Project Time
- About an hour (to allow paint to dry between coats)

Project Location
- Outside or well-ventilated area

 

 

Magnetic Pumpkin

  • Lay newspaper or cardboard to protect surface.
  • Wipe dirt or dust off pumpkin so paint will stick. 
  • Cover pumpkin with magnetic paint. This may take several coats to build up the magnetism.
  • Test with a magnet when dry. Add layers of magnetic paint until magnets hold on the sides.

Decorate Glow in the Dark Magnetic Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science

Colored Pumpkins

  • We decided to paint one half of the pumpkin. On the backside, we painted over the magnetic paint with black acrylic chalkboard paint.
  • Before the paint was dry, we lightly sprinkled some glow powder for a special effect.
  • While the paint was drying, we began work on our face…
How to Make Magnetic Glow in the Dark Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science
The blue glowing letters are written in Invisible Pen. They only show up under a Black Light.

Glow in the Dark Pumpkin

  • Draw the face pieces on the contact paper and cut each piece out. Peel the pieces off the paper backing and arrange them as a face for your pumpkin.
  • Once your jack-o-lantern face is complete, take your pumpkin outside and place it on the drop cloth.
  • Spray sections of the pumpkin with the spray adhesive, immediately following with the Glow Powder. For best results, hold the adhesive 10-14 cm (4-6 in) away from the pumpkin and spray a heavy coat. When sprinkling the powder, you may also want to tilt your pumpkin to get it evenly covered.
  • Pour the Glow Powder from its jar into an empty salt shaker. This will make it much easier to sprinkle the powder onto your pumpkin.
    Alternately, you can pour the Glow Powder into an empty portion cup. Cover the top of he portion cup with aluminum foil and hold it in place with a rubber band. Use a thump tack to poke holes in the tin foil… just like a salt shaker!

Decorate Glow in the Dark Magnetic Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science

  • Continue spraying and powdering each section of the pumpkin until the entire pumpkin is completely covered with powder. Carefully shake off any excess powder as you go.
  • Collect the excess Glow Powder and pour it back into the shaker.
  • Repeat steps four and five to ensure that your pumpkin is evenly and completely covered with powder.
  • After the adhesive is completely dry, spray the entire pumpkin with the sealant to make sure that the Glow Powder stays affixed to the pumpkin.
  • After the pumpkin is dry, carefully pull the contact paper off of the pumpkin.

 Decorate Glow in the Dark Magnetic Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science

Final Decorating with Secret Messages

  • Using the Invisible Ink Pen, write a secret message on the non-face side. If you used chalkboard paint, you can also decorate with colored chalk.
  • Using the Magnetic Putty, we changed up the look by adding a uni-brow, a goatee and stringy hair.
  • For the final act, place the pumpkin next to a black light to read your secret messages and see a different side of your jack-0-lantern.

Decorate Glow in the Dark Magnetic Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science

The Science Behind

Learning about the science of things that glow requires an understanding of two important terms – fluorescence and phosphorescence. It’s also important to note that not all zinc sulfide glows, but luminous zinc sulfide does glow!

Fluorescence - This type of luminescence occurs when some form of radiation, such as light, causes an object to glow. For example, fluorescent papers and poster boards glow in the daylight. They may seem to glow even brighter under black light (ultraviolet), but in either case, as soon as the light is removed, the glow stops. Fluorescent things do not glow in the dark all by themselves – they require some other form of energy such as ultraviolet light to “excite” them.

Phosphorescence - Phosphorescence is just like fluorescence, except that the glow continues even after the light used to excite it is removed. “Glow in the dark” toys phosphoresce brightly in total darkness after being “charged” or excited by ordinary white or ultraviolet light.

Glow Powder works by absorbing surrounding light energy and then releasing that energy when the lights go out. It’s called a phosphorescent powder. It’s the perfect way to get your students excited about energy… and a great way to celebrate Halloween! Just add glow powder to almost any of our favorite products and you’ll have an eerie new take on your favorite experiments!

How to Make Magnetic Glow in the Dark Pumpkins for Halloween | Steve Spangler Science

So, how does zinc sulfide work? Imagine that an atom looks something like our solar system. The sun would be the nucleus consisting of positive charges called protons and neutral charges called neutrons. The planets spinning around the sun would be similar to the electrons of an atom in orbits around the nucleus.

When the electrons in the atoms of special molecules like zinc sulfide become excited, they move farther away from the nucleus — into higher or more distant orbits. In order to become excited, the electrons must take on energy. In this case, light provided the required energy to cause the electrons to move to a higher energy level. It’s as if Earth were to move farther away from the sun into the orbit of Mars or Jupiter.

The electrons will remain in the excited state as long as they receive light to energize them. But, when the light used as an exciter is removed, the electrons will slowly return to their original lower orbits. As they do so, they give up the energy that excited them in the form of light.

Thanks to Smashed Peas and Carrots for the original idea.

White Lightning Stick – A Perfect Companion on Halloween Night

When the lights are on, the White Lightning Stick looks like a plain styrofoam tube. Turn off the lights, and the White Lightning Stick comes alive – strobing with green, red and blue. Change the setting and it will also change through the colors of the rainbow.

White Lightning Stick - A light up the night companion for Halloween Night and trick-or-treating | Steve Spangler Science

 

The White Lightning Stick will begin strobing its lights with just the push of the button on one end. Press the button again and the light stick will morph through its colors. Press the button again and again to see solid pink lights and strobing red, blue, and green.

White Lightning Stick - A light up the night companion for Halloween Night and trick-or-treating | Steve Spangler Science

The White Lightning Stick is a great addition to any party and can even help you teach about the effects of strobing lights and color mixing. These glowing light sticks are popular in the summer for firefly or Fourth of July fun, but they also are the perfect companion for trick-or-treating.

Carry the Lightning Stick on Halloween night to light up your costume and become visible on the streets.

It’s durable, it’s entertaining, and it’s a hit no matter how you use it.

White Lightning Stick - A light up the night companion for Halloween Night and trick-or-treating | Steve Spangler Science

 

Ultimate Halloween Party Ideas from the Spangler Effect

A huge thank you to everyone who joined us today for our live Spangler Effect where Steve shared his best science demos for Halloween. They are perfect for a Halloween party, haunted house, classroom, birthday party or just some October fun. For those of you who missed our broadcast or are looking for more information, here are the experiments and activities Steve covered today.

Watch the Halloween Science Spangler Effect Special on YouTube -

Continue reading

Glow in the Dark Jack-o-Lantern Halloween Party Favors

Ooey, gooey gross slime, brains and worms go hand-in-hand with Halloween. If you are a room mom or parent planning any type of Halloween party this October, we have the best Halloween party favor for your guests.

The best part of this party favor? It isn’t more candy.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Kids love tactile materials – things that squish between their fingers and make all kinds of sounds. After a smashing Halloween party, send the kids home with Jack-o-Lantern slime.

We used our Atomic Slime Kit but you can also make your own slime with this simple slime recipe -

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Halloween Science Activity Guide | Steve Spangler ScienceMaterials

  • Elmers Glue (8 oz bottle of Elmers Glue-All or Glue Gel)
  • Borax (a powdered soap found in the grocery store)
  • Atomic Glow (to make the slime glow)
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Plastic cup (8 oz size works well)
  • Spoon
  • Measuring cup
  • Food coloring (Neon colors work awesome!)
  • Water
  • Paper towel (hey, youve got to clean up!)

Make Slime

  • This recipe is based on using a brand new 8 ounce bottle of Elmer’s Glue. Empty the entire bottle of glue into a mixing bowl. Fill the empty bottle with warm water and shake (okay, put the lid on first and then shake). Pour the glue-water mixture into the mixing bowl and use the spoon to mix well.
  • Go ahead… add a drop or two of food coloring or several drops of Atomic Glow to color or make it glow.
Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science
Adding the food coloring
  • Measure 1/2 cup of warm water into the plastic cup and add a teaspoon of Borax powder to the water. Stir the solution – don’t worry if all of the powder dissolves. This Borax solution is the secret linking agent that causes the Elmer’s Glue molecules to turn into slime.
  • While stirring the glue in the mixing bowl, slowly add a little of the Borax solution. Immediately you’ll feel the long strands of molecules starting to connect. It’s time to abandon the spoon and use your hands to do the serious mixing. Keep adding the Borax solution to the glue mixture (don’t stop mixing) until you get a perfect batch of Elmer’s slime.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Assembling the Party Favors

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Draw a jack-o-lantern face on each cup and let dry. Spoon a glop of slime into each cup. Seal with the lid and set aside for sharing.

Halloween Glow in the Dark Slime Party Favors | Steve Spangler Science

Huge thanks to Allison at Learn – Play – Imagine for the original idea!