Steve Spangler on The Ellen DeGeneres Show – May 2015

When someone is as awesome as Ellen DeGeneres, people tend to listen to what that person has to say. So when Ellen says, “Steve Spangler is the science teacher you always wanted to have in school,” we get pretty hyped-up around the office. That excitement is tenfold when it’s Steve Spangler on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

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We shouldn’t be surprised, really, that Ellen thinks so highly of our in-house magician and science teaching aficionado, she’s had him on her show a whopping 18 times. Well, at the posting of this blog, he’s only been on the show 17 times, but tomorrow marks the appearance that allows Steve to vote.

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Steve is used to getting students and teachers excited about science, but what about a talk show host?

Steve Spangler's 18th appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show May 27, 2015

Steve made his first appearance on the Ellen DeGeneres Show in September of 2007, teaching Ellen how to blow giant smoke rings, and he returned just a month later to demonstrate his exploding pumpkin trick. In one appearance, Steve wowed Ellen and her audience by letting an audience member walk on water… or at least a giant vat of cornstarch and water… and gave Ellen a little surprise when he ignited hydrogen and oxygen bubbles, right in her hands!

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During his last appearance…

What? You didn’t think we were going to give away all of the fun and excitement on our blog, did you? You just need to wait a day for the May 27th, 2015 appearance. Of course, schedules and listings may vary from city to city, so make sure to check your local television stations to find The Ellen DeGeneres Show where you live.

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What we can tell you is that Ellen is a HUGE fan of our Spangler Science Club monthly kits. They’re the best way to have a science experiences created by Steve delivered right to your door.

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Before we forget, we have a database of all the 17 appearances that Steve has made with Ellen, so make sure to hop over and check that out. Then, head over to our Facebook page to make sure you’re up to date on everything going on in the Steve Spangler Science world. Finally… keep making science fun. We know you are all good for it.

Cold Equations

When I was a kid, I read a short story called “The Cold Equations,” by Tom Godwin.  It scared me to death.  It was wonderful, but it scared me to death.  That there could be a situation wherein the milk of human kindness had no power, that there could be a situation wherein someone, of her own free will, could happily and blindly enter into something with the best of intentions, and die for it, gave me nightmares for years.  The cold fact that there are, indeed, cold facts, still gives me the shakes.

Tom Godwin - The Cold Equations

Now, equations are made up of factors, and once certain factors are selected, the combination thereof is an absolute, unless the factors are changed.  However, UNLESS the factors are changed, the answer can’t be any different than the natural result of those particular factors.

If any other number wants to elbow in, it must be rejected, if the 3 and the 2 are to stay, and if the answer MUST be 6.
If any other number wants to elbow in, it must be rejected, if the 3 and the 2 are to stay, and if the         answer MUST be 6.  There is no room for a 4 in this equation, unless we change the whole intent of the equation.

When the weather is such that it creates snow, or tornadoes, or rain, etc, those things are the natural result of a combination of factors which have no choice but to produce that particular outcome.

It’s an equation.  It’s a cold equation.    When the factors are there, the product, or outcome, is assured.

When the equation contains these factors, a tornado is inevitable.
When the equation contains these factors, a tornado is inevitable.

When the equation is set. . . when the factors are selected. . . . when the product is assured. . . . no amount of bargaining or begging can change the natural outcome of this equation, whether it concerns math class, or the weather, or a spaceship on which everything was measured and weighed and ANY additional ANYTHING will result in the loss of many lives.  Even if the additional something is a sweet, innocent teenage girl who just wanted to see her brother.  Even then.

As humans, we don’t like cold equations.  I don’t like them.  You probably don’t like them, either.  They’re too, well, cold.  Humans have compassion.  We love.  We make adjustments and we adapt circumstances to meet other circumstances.

Every once in a while, “Values Clarification” makes a comeback, is tried, and is rejected again.  Compassionate people don’t like to think that any of us would ever toss someone in a lifeboat overboard, even if doing so would insure the safety and survival of everybody else in the lifeboat.  I know I would not want to make that decision.

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There are aspects of life, however, that make use of cold equations.  Math.   Science.  I’ve read that many people think they dislike math and science when it’s really the idea of a cold equation that they dislike.

With math, there’s not much we can do with a cold equation.  2+2 is going to equal 4, and there’s nothing we can do about it.

In science, sometimes we can.  Oh, there are cold equations in science, but we can almost always do some experimenting.  Sure, if you drop Mentos in a bottle of Diet Coke, the result is pretty much assured, but what if we drop more, or fewer, or diet, or flavored Mentos?  What if we use Fanta soda?  The variety of factors, while sticking to the gist of the equation, can yield all kinds of products.

Tom Godwin’s short story is about an equation that allowed no deviation.  It’s truly a cold equation.  The young girl begs for her life, and insists that she didn’t do anything to die for.

But child, you did.

Of her own free will, she inserted herself into an already factored equation, and the addition did not fit.  Any altering of the equation would bring death to several others.  There could only be one solution.

The Cold Equations, Tom Godwin, MarilynCold equations.

Most situations allow for variation, but not a cold equation.  Not everything can be altered.  Sometimes, we have to alter ourselves, FORCE ourselves to do things we really would rather not do.  Those who insist that life be altered to suit them are living in a fool’s paradise.  All the insistence in the world will not stop a tornado in its path, or make a tidal wave change its mind and turn back.   The factors in such equations can only equal a set product.

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Human beings have the power to set the factors and change them if we desire, in order to produce the product we desire.  Not always, but sometimes.  We have to deal with some cold equations, but most human experiences do allow for deviation.

Now, click on the link in that first paragraph and go read the short story, “The Cold Equations.”  Don’t read it right before bedtime.  Tom Godwin, your story is absolutely superb.  I was horrified, and terrified, and lost in admiration.

 

1000 Appearances and Counting – Steve Spangler on 9news

Steve Spangler is known for creating amazing hands-on science experiences for kids. Whether it involves kits, toys, or incredible experiments, kids leave an experience with Steve feeling like science magicians.

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Over the last decade and change, Steve has also spent one afternoon a week making adults feel like science magicians on Denver’s local NBC affiliate, 9News – KUSA. News anchors, meteorologists… you name it, if they’ve worked in the 9News studio, they’ve experienced the hands-on hi-jinx that follows Steve wherever he goes. That’s what defines Steve Spangler on 9News.

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If you want a small sample of Steve on 9News, check out this video for a look back at the segments that made Steve popular.

May 22, 2015 marks a special milestone for Steve – his 1000th 9News appearance. That’s 1000 times that Steve has brought fun science, incredible young scientists, or crazy experiences to televisions all around Denver and the region.

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Steve’s 1000th appearance was always going to be special, but the presence of his entire family made it even more so. Give it a watch here.

We also put together an album of our favorite #SteveMoments over on our Flickr, so give that a look, as well.

Keep making science fun, Steve.

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Thank A Teacher This Week!

This is Teacher Appreciation Week, and this week, more than ever, we should all be thinking about all the teachers who have influenced us in a positive way.

Most of them, anyway!
Most of them, anyway!

I’ve posted here before about some of my favorite teachers, and those facts haven’t changed.  I still think of Mrs. Harrod, Mrs. Endris, and Dr. Jenkinson with all the loving feelings in the world.  They let a smallish, nerdy girl feel important, and if you’ve ever been a smallish, nerdy girl, you’ll know how wonderful that is.  And how rare.  (If you were a smallish, nerdy boy, you’ll know, too.)  No matter what kind of kid you were, you’ll know.  In fact, this applies to students of any age.  Teenage and adult students like to feel appreciated, too.

Steve Spangler understands this.  All of the products and all of the freebies and all of the experiments are made and meant to open worlds of wonder for all kids.  For all adults, too – nobody is ever too old to like to blow things up and learn the why and wherefore of the universe.  (Bonus points if you know why that expression is redundant.)

If you’re wondering about a gift for your favorite teacher, or your child’s teacher, look no further than Steve Spangler’s website, because our Gift Certificate will solve all your gift-giving problems.  I’m a teacher, and I’ll tell you the truth:  Teachers love gift certificates or gift cards.  After a single year in the classroom, a teacher will have collected enough mugs, candles, figurines, ornaments, and picture frames to start a gift shop.  Gift cards/certificates solve YOUR dilemma and give a teacher the chance to buy something he/she really wants or needs.

The best Teacher Appreciation gift possible!

Be sure to include a personal note with the certificate/card.  A personal remembrance is the most precious gift any teacher could ever receive.

Plagiarism, Compassion, and the Dinner Table

Plagiarism.  Compassion for plagiarism?  It was his third strike for the same offense.  Last Wednesday morning, after class,  I had to play “Plagiaristic Confrontation” again, and it was no fun. It’s never fun. All throughout my career, I’ve listened to teachers brag and purr about ‘bringing a student down,’ and I’ve sat there shaking my head in amazement, wondering what kind of people were in charge of classrooms these days. “Bringing a student down” was never a goal of mine; I am frankly horrified that anyone would do so happily, and that anyone could gloat about it afterwards. I always thought that one of my functions was to help students UP, not bring them down and brag about it to others who sat there applauding.

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Maybe I’m just an old softy (although there are those who would argue that point!!) but I just can not even imagine being happy about a student who was in trouble. Even when that trouble was the student’s own choice and fault, I’m still sorry, not gleeful. I might think things like, “Well, too bad, but life is full of choices and choices bring consequences, etc. etc.” but I couldn’t clap my hands and laugh because someone who is supposed to be the adult in charge gets off on bringing someone who is SUPPOSED to need help, down.

I might cry, but I wouldn’t laugh.

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Wednesday, in the hallway after class, talking to that student, reminding him about all the previous reminders, explaining the consequences of his choice to him, watching him wilt and lean against the wall and then cover his face with his hands and weep, did something to me that day. It made me want to write a post about younger students, and how we as the adults who are in charge need to do everything in our power to help them attain the skills they so desperately need in order to care for themselves and others as they grow up; we need to help our children appreciate culture so they might understand music and art and allow them to enrich and soothe their souls and give them something positive to do with leisure time; we need to help our children learn and understand everything we can possibly expose them to in the short amount of time they are entrusted to us; we need to show them how to figure things out all by themselves, and to appreciate those things that have no explanation at all, and to help them see that these are often the coolest things of all. We need to teach them compassion by demonstrating compassion; even more importantly, we need to teach them about empathy.

Empathy goes further than mere sympathy.  Sympathy feels for someone; empathy feels WITH someone.
Empathy goes further than mere sympathy. Sympathy feels for someone; empathy feels WITH someone.

THIS is the job of the parent-school team. Not drilling for ISTEP, not months of reviewing so a school will look good on paper and get more money, not sitting for seven hours in a classroom  for thirty minutes of enchantment and a list of vocabulary words, not going over the same stuff again and again and again because two kids still can’t do it, not hanging posters that say “Zero Tolerance” all over a school that publicly advertises its refusal to give second chances. . . . .

Here at Spangler Science, we want our students to learn.  We want them to learn science.  We want them to love to learn science.  We want them to love to learn science and apply it to the world.  We want our students to be so excited about science that they overflow with enthusiasm at the dinner table.  Science helps students understand that just because an attempt doesn’t work the first time they try it, that doesn’t mean it won’t work the next time.  And the next.  Persistence.  This applies to all of life, and getting their hands dirty with trying is a wonderful memory booster.

We make science fun!
We make science fun!

Good schools are not all about more money. You can throw money into a pigpen all day, and the pigs won’t care. Good schools are all about education. Education has been defined as “A change in behavior.” I want to qualify that statement by saying that to me, education is a POSITIVE change in behavior. And if we have to do a little tweaking to get the students’ attention, then so be it. And if we have to do a little strong -arming to get some parents to cooperate, well, so be that, too. Let the tweaking and strong-arming begin.

William Glasser

We must help our children learn, that they might become educated, that perhaps the behavior of the entire world might change..

If we do these things, then our children will never have to stand out in the hall with me, faces crumpled in horror, leaning against the wall and weeping because of the consequences of their own actions.

And I won’t have to go home and do the same.