Category Archives: Contributors

How to Study Density with Popcorn

by Christy McGuire, Contributor

Thanksgiving is almost here! You can use one of the original foods from the first Thanksgiving to discuss density with your students. Popcorn is fascinating because it changes so drastically during the cooking process. The color, shape and texture of a popped kernel are all different than those of an unpopped kernel. If you can spare the day before Thanksgiving break, this simple density experiment would be a great way to practice their inquiry skills, and a great excuse to have a treat in class!

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

If your students have already covered density, this is a great time to practice doing a full exploration complete with a written report. You might simply give them access to the relevant materials and set them loose with this challenge:

Find how density changes for popped verses upopped corn. Check the results of your experiment and write a description of your findings, including an error analysis.

If density is a new concept, or if your students are struggling to get the hang of the scientific method, you can help them figure out the procedure. Make them do as much of the thinking as possible though! Science is more fun for the engineer making the decisions than for the technician doing as he is told.

Leading questions to help students develop their procedures

How do we calculate density? (mass per volume)

What measurements will we need to take in order to find density? (mass and volume)

How do we measure mass? How do we measure volume? (balance, and appropriate beakers)

How are we changing the popcorn? (popping method)

The Science of Popcorn

Hints for a successful experiment

You can expect your popcorn to increase in volume by about 16X.

To  pop the corn over heat, put a couple of tablespoons of oil in the pot or beaker, add corn and heat over medium heat.

If you are using a microwave, you can measure the volume of the popcorn in a bag of microwave popcorn and assume the same volume is in a second bag of popcorn that you pop before class.

Increase accuracy by repeating with varying quantities of popcorn, or by combining data from multiple lab groups.

Science of Popcorn

Data Analysis

If you wish, you can have your students graph mass a function of volume for various amounts of unpopped corn, then do another graph for the popped corn. The slope of these graphs will be the density of the popcorn.

You can also ask your students to compute density algebraically, then graph density as a function of popped or unpopped.

Requiring students to analyze the accuracy of their results could provide some very interesting feedback. Lab groups could compare results with the rest of the class. They can also compare the initial and final masses and try to defend any changes that they find. My experience is that the mass of the popcorn actually increases during this experiment. Don’t tell your students! See what they can come up with to justify their own answers. Factors that they may want to consider include the mass and volume of the oil used to cook the kernels and the humidity on the day of the experiment.

No matter what your students’ level, this experiment can be adjusted to provide a challenging, and interesting exercise. I hope you will enjoy. Happy Thanksgiving!

 

Christy McGuire is a trained physics teacher who loves developing new ways for students to engage with science.  While taking a break from the high school classroom, Christy rediscovered that young children are tons of fun, and can learn powerful science and math too.  Now she is attempting to cross the excitement of early childhood style learning with serious STEM study to benefit students on both ends of the learning process.    Find activities and reflections on STEM learning on her blog: www.ThrivingSTEM.com.

How to Use Popcorn to Teach Rates

by Christy McGuire, Contributor

This time of year, students’ minds are starting to drift to the upcoming Thanksgiving Holidays. Why not use popcorn to channel a little of that excitement into your classroom? Use popcorn to teach graphing, rate, and slope. Let your students eat your props, and you will quickly be one of the coolest teachers to ever discuss rates.Here is how to use popcorn to teach rates.

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

The Slow Approach

Materials:

  • Popcorn
  • Paper towel
  • Small plastic bag
  • Cups of Potting Soil
  • Ruler

Last week I gave some ideas for teaching younger students about seeds using popcorn.  Corn germinates quickly and grows quickly too, which makes it a great plant to measure over a period of time. You can get a meaningful graph by measuring every day or so.

 

  1. Start having students set up corn to germinate in the window. You can expect germination to take about three days.
  2. Then plant it in a pot with soil.
  3. Have your students measure the height of the plants every day or every two days between now and Thanksgiving, and record your findings on a labeled data chart.
  4. On the last class before Thanksgiving break, you can have them graph their findings. You may want to remind them that time is the independent variable, and thus belongs on the x (across the page) axis. Height is the dependent variable and thus belongs on the y (vertical) axis.

How to Use Popcorn to Teach Rates

The Fast Approach

Materials:

  • Popcorn
  • Stop watch
  • Oil
  • Cooking Pot
  • Heat Source

(You can also use a bag of popcorn and a microwave)

Have your students get set with lined paper and their pencils. Tell them that during each twenty-second interval, they are to make a mark for each pop that they hear.
When you call time, move to the next line and make a mark for each pop. They will repeat until all the corn is popped.

  1. Put a couple tablespoons of oil in the cooking pot and about a quarter cup of popcorn. Cook on medium heat with the lid covering the pot.
  2. When you are finished, pop some more corn, and let your students enjoy while they make their data charts and graphs. Time is again the independent variable and belongs on the x (horizontal) axis.
  3. If there is interest, try repeating for differing amounts of popcorn and think about how the amounts affect your data.
How to Use Popcorn to Teach Rates
Analyzing the Data for Either Approach (or Both!)

Depending on where you are in your curriculum, there are a few different directions you can take your class after completing their graphs.

If you do both of these projects, ask students to write a paragraph comparing and contrasting the graphs.

Or, You can have your students draw tangent lines near the beginning and end of the curve. Tell them to find the slope of each and write an explanation of why the slopes are different.

Or, ask your students to add best fit lines to the graph and calculate their slopes. Students can write a paragraph in which they compare and contrast the results of the best fit line to those of the tangent line and give an opinion on which is more useful.

Or, tell students to add a third tangent line in the middle, and find that slope. Then, graph the slopes verses time.   Ask students to write a paragraph explain the meaning of this new slope.

Put popcorn on the shopping list and plan to have some fun in your class this week.

 

Christy McGuire is a trained physics teacher who loves developing new ways for students to engage with science.  While taking a break from the high school classroom, Christy rediscovered that young children are tons of fun, and can learn powerful science and math too.  Now she is attempting to cross the excitement of early childhood style learning with serious STEM study to benefit students on both ends of the learning process.    Find activities and reflections on STEM learning on her blog: www.ThrivingSTEM.com.

How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn
by Christy McGuire, Contributor

Students’ minds are turning to the holidays. You can harness some of that excitement by including some holiday-themed activities in your classroom.

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

There are many great learning activities that follow holiday themes. Here are two activities that combine Thanksgiving and science.

We love studying (eating!) popcorn seeds year round at our house.

Here are two activities that will help your students understand the parts and functions of a seed.

Used together you have a hands-on opportunity to discuss all the parts of a seed and their functions, and the general characteristics of a seed as well.

A key to making these activities irresistible. Is to use the same popcorn for all parts of the demonstration. If possible, pop the corn in front of your students.

Activity one : Grow a Popcorn Plant

This classic demonstration is more intriguing done with popcorn.

Materials:  

  • unpopped corn
  • baggies
  • wet paper towels
  • tape
  • windows

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

Steps: 

1. Let your students place three or so kernels in the baggy with a wet napkin.

2. Write their names on the baggies and tape them to the window.

Corn germinates quickly, so if you set this demonstration up on Friday, chances are good that by Monday you will have something fun to look at.

Some questions to ask the day that the seeds germinate:

“Where does the energy for the little plant to grow come from?”

“Why do all of our plants look similar to each other?”

“Why is corn planted in the spring and not in the fall?”

 

Activity two: Seed coat observation

This activity was actually developed by my children. Playing in water is always a hit!

For maximum excitement, pull this activity out on the day your students find the germinated popcorn seeds as a kind of extension.

Materials:  

  • unpopped corn
  • a method for popping the corn
  • water in small dishes

Steps: 

1. Hand out popped and unpopped corn.

2. Tell your students to draw pictures and write descriptions in their science journals.

3. Have your students place unpopped corn in a dish of water.

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

4. Pop some corn.

5. Have your students place it in a second dish of water.

6. Wait for five minutes or so. While you are waiting, discuss the seeds.

“What is the difference between these two types of popcorn?”

“What is the yellow shiny thing on the outside of the unpopped corn?”

“Why do you think seed coats are important?”

How to Study Seeds with Popcorn/How to Combine Thanksgiving and Science in your Elementary Classroom

7. When the five minutes has passed, encourage your students to make observations and record them by drawing pictures and  writing descriptions. First have them just look at the seeds, then allow them to touch the seeds as well.

Some questions to ask in summary:

What about the seeds changed?”

“What stayed the same?”

“Why do you think the seed coat is important?”

Finally after all that work, be sure to EAT some popcorn.   (Check for corn allergies first.) Nothing is better than eating your own experiment! Oh, and while you are munching, “What is it about seeds that makes them good to eat?”

 

 

Christy McGuire is a trained physics teacher who loves developing new ways for students to engage with science.  While taking a break from the high school classroom, Christy rediscovered that young children are tons of fun, and can learn powerful science and math too.  Now she is attempting to cross the excitement of early childhood style learning with serious STEM study to benefit students on both ends of the learning process.    Find activities and reflections on STEM learning on her blog: www.ThrivingSTEM.com.

 

 

Look Up! The Night Sky is Full of Awesome!

Does this look like a Big Bear (Ursa Major) to you?
Does this look like a Big Bear (Ursa Major) to you?

You don’t need a big, strong telescope to see wonders in the night sky.   All the ancients had was their eyes, and since the air was unpolluted and without the interference of electric lights, they could see quite a lot up there.  I’ve often thought that the ancients must have been able to see a lot more stars in the constellations, because none of them looks much like its name these days.  These ancients, with only their eyes, charted and mapped the sky, and did it so well that we are still able to use these same charts and maps. We also still use the names the ancients gave to what they saw in the sky.

Add to your eyes a pair of binoculars, and your night sky wonders will increase more than you could ever imagine.  Those first telescopes, remember, weren’t nearly as powerful as those pink Happy Meal binoculars on the floor of your van.  If you have powerful big-boy/girl binoculars, all the better.

Without a telescope – with just binoculars – you’ll be able to see several of Jupiter’s moons, and Saturn’s rings (if it’s turned the right way) and Venus & Mars as discs, not just dots.

Remember how to spot a planet:  they don’t twinkle as stars do.  Only objects that shine with their own light will twinkle; the objects that shine with reflected light will just shine; they won’t twinkle.  Think about it: a twinkling moon would be more than just a little bit scary!

I used to be a little girl who sneaked outside late at night to lie on top of the car and scan the sky with those very same pink plastic binoculars.

Thank you, Santa, for granting my only wish that Christmas.  I still have the telescope; it’s leaning in the corner in the living room.  Thank telescope, Spangler Sciencethe elves for me, too; they did a great job.

So yes, I have known what it feels like to have a genuine wish come true.  While other little girls crossed their fingers and shut their eyes and hoped for Barbie under the tree that year, all I wanted was a telescope.  And I got it.  I can still remember the sensation of realizing my wish had been granted.

And with it, I could watch the universe, unfolding, closer and clearer than ever.  It’s not all science, you know.  It’s everything.  Science just helps us make sense of it.

Earn a Science-Themed Badge at Junior Ranger Programs at a National Park

By Contributor Jacquie Fisher, KC Edventures

The Junior Ranger programs in our National Parks are a wonderful way to introduce kids to hand-on science opportunities.  Science and nature activities are offered to kids and families are more than 200 of our National Parks and Monuments.

Where to earn science-themed Junior Ranger badges | Steve Spangler Science

We love the Junior Ranger programs and have attended quite a few over the years.   Kids as young as 4 years old can get involved in the programs.  Activity booklets are available at the park ranger’s stations or online.  To become a Junior Ranger, a child just needs to complete the activities listed for their age group.  Many Junior Ranger programs can be completed in one or two visits to the park and some activities can be done at home (or in the car if you’re traveling).

Fun activities such as animal observations, nature exploration and ranger workshops are available.  If you have a child who is interested in a specific area of science, attending one of the Junior Ranger programs is the perfect way to extend their interest and learning.

Junior Ranger Programs for science-based badges in National Parks

Astronomy

Many of the National Parks will offer ranger-led astronomy programs during the summer months.  Seeing the sky from a National Park is an outstanding experience as there is little man-made light in the parks.  Families will be amazed at how many stars can be viewed on a clear evening.  For many Junior Ranger programs, attending a stargazing event will help kids to earn their badge.

A few of the parks have very extensive astronomy offerings:

Bryce Canyon National Park (Utah)

Joshua Tree National Park (California)

Badlands National Park (South Dakota)

 

Paleontology

Many children love to read about dinosaurs and fossils.  In fact, some even dream about growing up to become paleontologists.  Our National Parks can help with that dream — the parks offer Junior Paleontologist Programs that can be completed at locations across the country.  Currently, more than 200 parks and sites help to preserve fossils.  Some of the more fossil-rich parks include:

Badlands National Park (South Dakota)

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument (Oregon)

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument (Colorado)

Fossil Butte National Monument (Wyoming)

Dinosaur National Monument (Colorado/Utah)

 

Marine Science/Oceanography

If you have children who are interested in ocean life, they will enjoy activities that focus on learning and protecting our marine life and coastlines.  Visit some of the following National Parks for Junior Ranger activities that emphasis marine science:

Canaveral National Seashore (Florida)

Mississippi National River & Recreation Area (Minnesota)

Olympic National Park (Washington)

Cape Hatteras National Seashore (North Carolina)

 

Volcanoes & Geysers

In addition to protecting our wildlife and natural areas, Junior Ranger programs are also very focused on educating kids about natural formations.  There are very few places where visitors can walk on a volcano or watch a geyser erupt.  Ranger talks and activities at these National Parks will introduce your family to the underground workings of our Earth:

Yellowstone National Park (Idaho, Wyoming, Montana)

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park (Hawaii)

Capulin Volcano National Monument (New Mexico)

Lassen Volcanic National Park (California)

 

Speleology

Speleology is the study of caves and the National Park system is host to some of the most beautiful and longest caves in the world.  If you’re child is interested in these amazing underground passageways, a visit to one of the following parks to explore an amazing  underground world!

Mammoth Cave National Park (Kentucky)

Oregon Cave National Monument (Oregon)

Jewel Cave National Monument (South Dakota)

 

Geology

Yes, rocks!  What kid doesn’t love to do some rock-hounding.  Some of the parks have Junior Geologist programs available for kids who want to learn about rock layers, erosion and all those cool colorful stones!

Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)

Capital Reef Nationa Park (Utah)

North Cascades National Park (Washington)

 

In addition to discipline specific Junior Ranger programs, you can also find a Young Scientist program at Yellowstone National Park.

And if you aren’t able to visit one of our beautiful parks, kids can also learn about science and nature right in their own home.  Visit the National Parks Webrangers online program for fun activities that teach children about nature and animals.

Junior Ranger Programs Across the Country - Hands-on Science | Steve Spangler Science

Jacquie Fisher ECEdventures

Jacquie Fisher is the found of Edventures with Kids where she shares unique ideas for keeping kids creative & curious.  She believes that kids are more likely to enjoy learning when they are offered hands-on activities and the opportunity to explore new places.   ‘Edventures’ are fun ideas that encourage families to try new activities, get outdoors, travel to new locations and connect kids with great books.  You can also find them on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.